Carbon, Copper, and Nickel Steels

Request A Quote

The iron-carbon, iron-copper, and iron-nickel steels are the “work horse” alloys of the PM industry. Designed for light to moderate loading, they are economical to process due to their ease of machinability, ease with which they may be pressed to moderately high densities, and their ability to be sintered effectively in a variety of atmospheres. These alloys may also be heat treated to improve strength and hardness, but due to their limited hardenability, must be heat treated with a secondary post-sintering process. Applications abound across numerous industries, including gears, pinions, sprockets, bearings, rotors, cams, flywheels, housings, levers, brackets, couplings etc. for automotive, motor cycle, hardware, lawn and garden, and other industrial markets.

The following tables contain a list of the materials available. For more complete coverage of properties, reference MPIF Standard 35, ASTM B783, ISO 5755, DIN 30910-4, and JIS Z2550, and download the technical information bulletins of interest. Standard powder metal materials are defined in North America by MPIF Standard 35 and ASTM B783, essentially equivalent standards. German PM steels are listed in DIN 30910-4, or more recently, ISO 5755. Japan steels are listed in JIS Z2550, with grade names changing with the revision from 1989 to 2000.

TYPE
GRADES
DESCRIPTION
Iron
MPIF/ASTM F-0000
ISO F-00
DIN Sint-C 00, Sint-D 00, Sint-E 00
JIS SMF 1015, SMF 1020, P1024, P1025, P1026
Iron without carbon additions is ferritic in structure, soft, ductile, and magnetic.
Iron-Carbon Steel MPIF/ASTM F-0005, F-0008
ISO F-05, F-08
DIN Sint-C 01, Sint-D 01
JIS SMF 3030, SMF 3035, P1034, P1035, P1044, P1045
The addition of carbon improves the strength in as-sintered parts by creating a ferritic and pearlitic structure. The steel is also heat treatable.
Iron-Copper
&
Iron-Copper-Carbon Steel
MPIF/ASTM FC-0200, FC-0205, FC-0208, FC-0505, FC-0808, FC-1000
ISO F-00C2, F-05C2, F-08C2
DIN Sint-C 10, Sint-D 10, Sint-E 10, Sint-C 11, Sint-D 11, C-C 21
JIS SMF 2025, SMF 2030, SMF 4040, SMF 4050, SBF 2118, PP2024,
P2025, P2034, P2035, P2044, P2045, P2054, P2055, P2064, P2074
Adding copper to iron-carbon steel improves properties through solid solution strengthening as well as improving the hardenability of the steel.
Iron-Nickel
&
Iron-Nickel-Carbon Steel
MPIF/ASTM FN-0200, FN-0205, FN-0208, FN-0405, FN-0408
ISO F-05N2, F-05N4, F-08N2, F-08N4
JIS SMF 5030, SMF 5040, SMF 7020, SMF 7025, SMF 8035,
SMF 8040, P1064, P1065, P1094, P1096, P2124, P2126
Adding nickel to iron-carbon steel improves the strength, toughness, and hardenability of the steel.

Carbon, Copper, and Nickel Steels - As-Sintered


Chemistry Typical Properties
GRADE
Fe
C
Cu
Ni
Density
g/cm 3
Tensile Strength
ksi (MPa)
Yield Strength
ksi (MPa)
Elongation
%
Unnotched Impact
Energy
ft-lb (J)
Apparent Hardness
HRB
F-0000
Bal
0.3 max
-
-
6.7
7.3
25 (170)
38 (260)
18 (120)
25 (170)
2
7
6 (8)
35 (47)
60 HRF
80 HRF
F-0005
 
F-0008
Bal
 
Bal
0.3-0.6
 
0.6-0.9
-

-
-

-
6.6
6.9
6.6
7.0
32 (220)
38 (260)
42 (290)
57 (390)
23 (160)
28 (190)
35 (240)
40 (260)
1

<1
1
4 (5)
5 (7)
4 (5)
5 (7)
40
55
60
70
FC-0205

FC-0208
Bal

Bal
0.3-0.6

0.6-0.9
1.5-3.9 - 6.7
7.1
6.7
7.2
50 (340)
60 (410)
60 (410)
75 (520)
45 (310)
50 (340)
55 (380)
65 (450)
<1 5 (7)
8 (10)
5 (7)
7 (9)
60
72
73
84
FN-0200

FN-0205

FN-0208

FN-0405

FN-0408
Bal

Bal

Bal

Bal

Bal
0.3 max

0.3-0.6

0.6-0.9

0.3-0.6

0.6-0.9
2.5 max
 

2.5 max
 

2 max
1-3
 

1-3
 

3.0-5.5
7.0
6.9
7.2
6.9
7.1
7.0
6.9
35 (240)
50 (340)
60 (410)
55 (380)
70 (480)
60 (410)
65 (450)
25 (170)
30 (210)
35 (240)
40 (280)
45 (310)
40 (280)
50 (340)
5
2
4
1
2
3
1
20 (27)
12 (16)
21 (28)
8 (11)
11(15)
14.5 (20)
7.5 (10)
75 HRF
59
69
71
77
71
78

Density ranges for the materials listed are typically for single-pressed parts. Higher densities can be achieved with double-pressing.

Carbon, Copper, and Nickel Steels – Heat-Treated

Chemistry Typical Properties
Fe
C
Cu
Ni
Density
g/cm 3
Tensile Strength
ksi (MPa)
Yield Strength
ksi (MPa)
Elongation
%
Unnotched Impact Energy
ft-lb (J)
Apparent Hardness
HRC
F-0005-HT

F-0008-HT

Bal
0.3-0.6

0.6-0.9
- - 6.6
7.0
6.6
6.9
60 (410)
80 (550)
75 (520)
85 (590)
~UTS <1 3 (4)
4 (5)
4 (5)
4.5 (6)
20
25
28
32
FC-0205-HT

FC-0208-HT
0.3-0.6

0.6-0.9
1.5-3.9 - 7.0
6.8
7.1
100 (690)
90 (620)
105 (720)
~UTS <1 3.5 (5)
5.5 (7)
4.5 (6)
5.5 (7)
25
36
35
43
FN-0205-HT

FN-0208-HT

FN-0405-HT
Bal

Bal
0.3-0.6

0.6-0.9

0.3-0.6
2.5 max

2 max
1-3

3.0-5.5
6.6
7.1
6.7
7.0
6.5
7.0
90 (620)
145 (1000)
90 (620)
145 (1000)
80 (590)
130 (930)
~UTS <1

<1
3.5 (5)
6 (8)
4 (5)
5.5 (7)
4 (5)
6.5 (9)
23
33
26
35
99 HRB
21

Density ranges for the materials listed are typically for single-pressed parts. Higher densities can be achieved with double-pressing. “HT” attached to a grade name indicates the material has been hardened, either by conventional heat treating or by rapid cooling in the sintering furnace, known as “sinter-hardening”.